Senate Judiciary Committee Convenes Mid-Break To Process More Nominees

Press Release


WASHINGTON, D.C., October 12, 2022 – The Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing today to consider more of President Biden’s exceptionally qualified judicial nominees that featured several standouts. 

Justice Adrienne C. Nelson, nominated to the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon, currently sits on the Oregon State Supreme Court. Nelson will further grow the ranks of former public defenders serving on our federal courts to help balance the overwhelming number of former prosecutors. When she was first appointed as a state trial court judge in 2006, she was only the second Black woman judge ever in Oregon. Now with 16 years of judicial experience under her belt, she stands to make history again as the first Black woman to serve on the District Court for Oregon. 

Matthew L. Garcia, nominated to the U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico, built his legal career fighting for civil rights as a solo practitioner and at small law firms. His extensive plaintiff-side litigation is sorely needed given how many current judges have only worked at large firms protecting the wealthy and powerful. It is also refreshing to see a Latino nominee, as Latinx judges are unfortunately quite underrepresented on our courts, even in states like New Mexico with significant Latinx populations. 

Judge Daniel Calabretta, nominated to the U.S. District for the Eastern District of California, would be the first openly LGBTQ+ judge to serve on that court. He brings extensive experience with constitutional law, particularly given his work as a Deputy Attorney General litigating around California ballot initiatives — including Proposition 8, which banned same-sex marriage in the state but was ultimately ruled unconstitutional. He has served as a state judge since 2019, when he became the first openly gay man appointed to the Superior Court for the County of Sacramento. 

Alliance for Justice President Rakim H.D. Brooks issued the following statement: 

“The Senate Judiciary Committee is again to be applauded for advancing these outstanding nominees to our federal courts. The full Senate should now return as soon as possible to resume confirmations. Time during the lame duck period is limited, and judicial nominations won’t be the only priority demanding the Senate’s attention. There is no time to waste in ensuring these judicial nominees cross the finish line before the end of this year, or else they may never receive the votes they deserve.”